Sol LeWitt’s Wall Drawing at SFMOMA

The other month I visited the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and Sol LeWitt’s Wall Drawing 273 was one of my favorite installations there.

The installation is made from graphite and crayon on seven walls. I’m drawn to geometric shapes when it comes to works of art that I admire, and I liked the simplistic use of line and color. It creates an overall clean and minimalist look.

I drew some inspiration from LeWitt’s use of line. Perhaps I’ll start playing with bolder lines in my own work.

Tomás Saraceno’s Stillness in Motion – Cloud Cities at SFMOMA

Tomás Saraceno's Stillness in Motion - Cloud Cities

The other month I had a chance to visit San Francisco, and spent a few hours wandering around the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. One of my favorite pieces was the installation work by Tomás Saraceno – Stillness in Motion – Cloud Cities.

Tomás Saraceno's Stillness in Motion - Cloud Cities

I absolutely loved the simple, geometric shapes that took over the room. I also liked how he wove mirrors into these shapes, which continued to play with your perception of the depth of the room.

Tomás Saraceno's Stillness in Motion - Cloud Cities

Here you can get a sense of how large the webs are in relation to the museum patrons.

Tomás Saraceno's Stillness in Motion - Cloud Cities

It was wonderful learning about a new artist, and experiencing his work in-person. It was an inspiring visit that helped jump-start my creativity.

Yayoi Kusama’s Infinity Mirrors at the Hirshhorn

Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors exhibit

As an artist, I’m constantly finding inspiration around me. Sometimes that inspiration comes from the beautiful sights I see when I travel or go for walks, and other times it comes from unique experiences I have. This past weekend I was lucky enough to get tickets to see the popular Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors exhibit at the Hirshhorn. It was an incredibly inspiring show.

Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors exhibit

The exhibit consists of five small rooms where two to three people are allowed inside for twenty or thirty seconds. Each room made me feel like I was exploring a new world. The rooms were covered in mirrors and had either lights or sculptures arranged in a pattern that was repeated infinitely in the mirrored walls.

Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors exhibit

My museum visit lasted hours. My tickets were for 12:30pm but we weren’t admitted until after 1:30pm. The entire show required waiting in line for a chunk of time before we were able to enter each of the five rooms. Although there was a lot of waiting involved, I thought it was well worth it. Only once in a while do I find myself going to an art exhibit where afterwards it leaves me marveling at the beauty of the world. Kusama’s exhibit left me feeling just that- and it left me feeling hopeful, with my imagination reenergized.

Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors exhibit

So if you have a chance to see Kusama’s work, I highly recommend doing so. Kusama’s Infinity Mirrors exhibit was an experience like no other.

Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors exhibit

Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors exhibit

Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors exhibit